Things your Florist wishes you knew

Today we’re talking about the Things that your Florist wishes you knew:

*Please be honest with us about the budget.  Just because you tell me that your budget is $X does not mean that I am automatically going to try and get you to spend the whole thing plus more.  Florists, unlike many other vendors, typically do not have a set package–everything is custom down to the number of stems in each arrangement to the rhinestone accents on the wrap around the stems.  Therefore, brides need to understand that their florist can pretty much make a bouquet to fit any budget, it’s just a matter of the style of design and the kind of flowers.  It’s almost easier if the bride were to tell me, “I want to spend $150 on my bouquet and it must have some callas in it” because, I can do that!  But then it’s the florist’s job to demonstrate size and so forth to make certain she will be happy.

*Bring as much information to me as you can for our first meeting – swatches and pictures of your gown and the bridesmaid’s gowns, pictures you love, pictures you hate, your colors and whatever else you can think of.  I want to see it all because it will give me an idea of what you really like – not just what you think you like.

*Before we meet, please sit down and make a list of all the people who will be getting personal flowers – grandparents, parents, bridesmaids, groomsmen, readers, soloists, etc.  This will help you get an accurate quote since all those flowers will be accounted for – even a few extra corsages can really add up on a tight budget.

*Please don’t take my design proposal to another florist and ask them if they can do it for less.

*Changes are fine – up to a point.  If we meet a year before your wedding, I actually expect that some things (sometimes everything) are going to change from our first meeting.  That is fine but just be aware that if you change flowers, the pricing may change.  I can make changes up to 2-3 weeks before the wedding but once we have that final meeting, I am going to order your flowers and the design is final.

*Obvious statement here: flowers are perishable.  Be gentle with them.  If you take your bouquet of hydrangeas out of the vase of water I provide you and leave it out for hours on a hot July Saturday afternoon, it’s going to wilt!  Don’t be angry with me when it starts looking bad and don’t say I didn’t warn you.  If you leave corsages and boutonnieres in the bags out of refrigeration for hours they are going to wilt–or at least blow open (roses especially) due to the heat.  Leaving wearables in the bags yet out of refrigeration is like putting your flowers in an incubator–it’s sweltering in there!  The reason for the bag is to create humidity (flowers like it humid) while in the cooler.

*Flowers are a product of Mother Nature and are grown (mostly) outside.  There may be a dark spot on a red rose–it’s natural!  Now if the whole rose is dark and ugly, well, that’s different.  Silk flowers today are being made more imperfect to look real, so it surprises me how people think they need to be flawless.  They are far from it, but that is part of their beauty!

*The conditions in the US are not right for growing many flowers.  Most flowers come from South America, where the climate is right year round for flower production.  When you are paying for a flower, the bulk of the cost is really shipping and handling.  It costs more to ship the bloom in from Holland or South America than the actual flower itself.  If you do purchase flowers grown in the US, most are sub-par as compared to our international counterparts.  Domestic roses last a fraction of the time and are smaller than those from Ecuador.  Weather has everything to do with it.

*A home based florist can charge a fraction of what a brick and mortar shop does because they don’t have rent, utilities, etc.  They also, usually, do not have the proper storage (coolers made just for flower storage so they are high humidity and controlled temperature).  Many home based florists do a fine job but just be certain if you select a florist that works from home that they have the resources they need to do the job correctly.

*The biggest variance in cost from florist to florist is labor – you will be paying for a designer’s experience, reputation and schooling.  It’s the same reason you pick the best board-certified surgeon for your heart surgery, why should choosing your florist (or any vendor, for that matter) be any different?  Those with the best reputations charge for that.  Those with lots of experience, those who have been through lots of trainings and know how to do cool things for their clients charge for that.  It’s creativity.  Not everyone is born able to design flowers.  There is an element of skill to it as with any design based discipline.

Thank you so much to my florist friends who contributed.  Tomorrow we’ll learn all the Things that your Stationer/Graphic Designer wishes you knew – I got a LOT of input on this one so stay tuned!

8 Responses to “Things your Florist wishes you knew”

  1. uberVU - social comments Says:

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by emilieduncan: BLOG: Things your Florist wishes you knew http://bit.ly/2Uu2mb

  2. uberVU - social comments Says:

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by emilieduncan: BLOG: Things your Florist wishes you knew http://bit.ly/2Uu2mb

  3. Tracy D'Amico Says:

    Excellent information – thanks so much for succintly saying what many of us struggle to put into words!

  4. Tracy D'Amico Says:

    Excellent information – thanks so much for succintly saying what many of us struggle to put into words!

  5. Tracy Says:

    my I please put this on my blog.. and give you the credit~~

  6. Sylvia Says:

    may add this to my website, myspace with credit and link to this site?

  7. Sylvia Says:

    may add this to my website, myspace with credit and link to this site?

  8. Rick King AIFD, CFD, SCCPF, NCCPF Says:

    Thank you for stating this…..